B‘More Healthy Communities for Kids (BHCK)

BHCK Logo (Large)

Overview

This was a multilevel, multi-component systems based childhood obesity prevention trial implemented in multiple levels of the Baltimore Food System to improve access, demand, affordability and consumption of healthier foods among low-income urban families. Our research partnered with stakeholders and community organizations at different levels, e.g., the policy, wholesaler, retailer, adult caregiver, and individual child levels. Twenty eight low-income, predominantly African American geographic zones were identified and randomized to receive the program or a delayed program. Within each intervention zone we worked with at least 3 small food stores and prepared food sources to increase access to healthy foods through wholesaler promotions, display point of purchase promotional materials, and provided nutrition and food preparation education targeting youth and their caregivers in recreation centers and social media, respectively.  We worked with local policymakers to institutionalize and sustain these changes. We also conducted a pilot study with two local urban farms and neighboring corner store markets aimed to introduce local produce as part of the retail food store component of the intervention.

Goals

  • To develop a community-based obesity prevention program, which operates at multiple levels of the Baltimore city food system (policy, wholesaler, corner stores, carryout, household, individual), and aims to increase affordability, availability, purchase and consumption of healthy foods within underserved neighborhoods.

  • To implement the program with high quality according to initial plans – with high reach, dose and fidelity in 14 high-risk zones in Baltimore City.

  • To evaluate the impact of the program on:

    • Healthy food pricing and availability in small food sources and community wholesalers
    • Low-income African American adult food purchasing and preparation behaviors
    • Low-income African American youth diet, and associated psychosocial factors for healthy eating

Staff

Anna Kharmats
Anna KharmatsPhD Candidate
Anna Kharmats earned her B.S. in Human Development and M.A. in Developmental Psychology, from Cornell University. After completing a year of AmeriCorps, New York City HealthCorps service, she began the doctoral program in Social and Behavioral Interventions at Johns Hopkins University.
Yeeli Mui
Yeeli MuiPhD Candidate
Her research interests encompass improving the neighborhood built and social environments to foster a culture of healthy eating and living and to reduce health disparities, particularly in distressed communities. Yeeli spearheaded the Policy Working Group for the BHCK and managed the development of agent-based models that simulated the dietary and physical activity behaviors of individuals within a virtual environment.
Angela Trude
Angela TrudePhD Candidate
Angela Trude, MSc is a PhD Candidate in the Center for Human Nutrition at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health and a Senior Analyst at the Global Obesity Prevention Center. Ms. Trude is a public health nutritionist interested in the environmental and social determinants of obesity and diet-related chronic disease prevention in low-income populations.
Dr. Betsy Anderson Steeves
Dr. Betsy Anderson SteevesPrevious Project Coordinator
Dr. Anderson Steeves is an Assistant Professor in the Public Health Nutrition program and Director of the HEALTHE Lab at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. She is a Registered Dietitian and holds a doctoral degree in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. She completed her Master’s in Public Health Nutrition and Dietetic Internship at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Lisa Poirier
Lisa PoirierResearch Data Manager and Analyst
Lisa manages the data collection, entry, and analysis for the healthy stores projects. Her research interests in urban food environments, food system sustainability, and the use of urban farms to alleviate food deserts.

Project Features

BHCK_ProjFeatures-min

The intervention trial utilizes a systems-based approach to test and evaluate multilevel structural interventions. Please click on the graph below for more information on project features by intervention component.

  • To work with key stakeholders:
    • To develop and build the evidence base to support policies for a healthier food environment in Baltimore City
    • To sustain BHCK activities
  • Held 10 meetings with City stakeholders since kick-off in July 2013
  • Developed simulation models to aid stakeholder decision-making
  • Increase stocks and sales of affordable healthy food options
  • Promote BHCK supported food and beverages through signage
  • Provide discounts on healthier food items to BHCK-participating corner store and carryout owners
  • Three wholesalers participated
  • Increase availability of healthier food and beverages using materials and incentives
  • Increase demand for healthier food through point-of-purchase promotions
  • Implement training modules for store owners
  • Promote switch to lower-fat cooking methods in carryouts
  • Utilized Baltimore City high school and college students as BHCK Youth Leaders
  • Youth Leaders implemented a 14 lesson nutrition curriculum in 14 local recreation centers’ after school programs.
  • Lessons focused on 4 topics: smart snacks, breakfast, healthy cooking, smart drinks
  • Lessons took place once every other week for 6 months
  • Youth Leaders underwent intensive training on leadership and nutrition topics
  • To reinforce key nutrition and health related messages targeted at BHCK adult caregivers
    • Utilized bidirectional text messaging for goal setting and behavior change
      • Sent 3 texts per week to our intervention participants using EZ text platform to track analytics
    • Facebook and Instagram page to share recipes, intervention activities, and community events
      • Posted every day during the intervention using a posting schedule, with each day of the week having a theme such as videos, recipes, store events, shoutouts to other intervention components, etc.
      • Facebook: bhck1
      • Instagram: bmore4kids
    • Used Twitter to engage with policymakers and community partners
      • Focused on current health policy changes, joined relevant twitter chats, posted 11-15 times per day or more (including retweets)
      • Twitter: bmore4kids

Interventions Included

  • Handouts distributed to participants at store and recreation center sessions.
  • Displays, shelf labels, and posters used in corner stores and carryouts as point of purchase promotions
  • Posting occurred regularly and followed a schedule to maintain follower engagement
  • Text messages sent out 3 times per week to caregivers to reinforce educational messages and goal setting
  • Biweekly sessions in recreation centers for children 10-14 years old
  • Biweekly sessions in recreation centers for children 10-14 years old
  • In corner stores, carryouts, and recreation centers
  • Sessions included discussion, handouts, giveaways and taste tests
  • Via shelf labels and in store circular
  • Promoted foods labeled on shelves, BHCK logo highlighted promoted foods on sale in circular
  • Owners received a giftcard every subphase to purchase initial stock
  • Participants received these at recreation center, corner store and carryout interactive sessions to increase awareness of activities and help encourage new healthier behaviors.
  • Owners earned incentives for watching training videos, bringing in new products, and maintaining shelf labels in the proper location
  • Carryouts received new menu boards
  • Frequent engagement with policymakers through meetings, testimony, and op-eds
  • Sent out once every two weeks to families and included handouts, recipes, giveaways, challenges to reinforce intervention messages and maintain communication between data collection measures.
  • Home visits during the summer months by mentors and study staff to continue goal setting with family
  • Program involved weekly text messages with mentee, corner store tour, home visits, and weekly phone calls

Phases of Research

Phase
(2 months long)
Sub phases
(2 weeks long)
Educational
Messages
Promoted
Foods
Phase Specific
Giveaways
Phase 1.
Smart Drinks
1.1 Bottled Water

1.2 Sugar Free Drinks

1.3 Lower Sugar Soda/Diet Soda

1.4 Low- Calorie Drinks

Rethink your drink,
lower sugar beverages
Bottled water, sugar free drink mixes,
lower sugar/diet soda, lower calorie fruit drinks
Orange stress balls, water bottles,
drawstring bags, sunglasses
Phase 2.
Smart Snacks
2.1 Sugar Substitutions

2.2 Salty Substitutions

2.3 Fruit as a Snack

2.4 Body Building Snacks

Snacks lower
in sugar and salt
Fresh fruit, canned fruit or fruit cups in
100% juice, applesauce, fresh vegetables,
sunflower seeds, nuts/trail mix
without chocolate, low-fat string cheese,
low-fat yogurt, low-fat granola bars,
baked chips, low-fat popcorn, pretzels
Grape stress ball, chip clip,
apple pen, sunglasses
Phase 3.
Smart Cooking/Breakfast
3.1 Breakfast

3.2 Whole Grains

3.3 Vegetables

3.4 Cooking Methods

Breakfast,
whole grains,
vegetables, cooking methods
Skim/1% milk, low sugar/high fiber cereal, whole wheat breads,
pastas, rice, tortillas, fresh, frozen,
low sodium canned veggies, cooking spray, low-fat condiments
Chip clip, grocery bag, jar opener, portion plate

Publications / Citations / Presentations

  • Anderson Steeves E, Martins PA, Gittelsohn J. (2014) “Changing the Food Environment for Obesity Prevention: Key Gaps and Future Directions,” Current Obesity Reports, Dec;3(4):451-458. PMID:25574452, PMCID: PMC4283210
  • Gittelsohn J, Trude A. Environmental Interventions for Obesity and Chronic Disease Prevention. J Nutr Sci Vitaminol (Tokyo). 2015;61 Suppl:S15-6. PMID: 26598834, PMCID: PMC5710840
  • Diabetes and obesity prevention: changing the food environment in low-income settings Joel Gittelsohn; Angela Trude. Nutrition Reviews 2017 75 (suppl 1): 62-69 doi: 10.1093/nutrit/nuw038. PMID: 28049750, PMCID: PMC5207007
  • Ewart-Pierce E, Mejia Ruiz MJ, Gittelsohn J. “Whole-of-Community” Obesity Prevention: A Review of Challenges and Opportunities in Multilevel, Multicomponent Interventions. Curr Obes Rep. 2016. PMID: 27379620.
  • Mikkelsen B, Novotny R, Gittelsohn J. Multi-Level, Multi-Component Approaches to Community Based Interventions for Healthy Living—A Three Case Comparison. Int J Environ Res Public Heal 2016, Vol 13, Page 1023. 2016;13(10):1023. doi:10.3390/IJERPH13101023. PMID: 27775630, PMCID: PMC5086762
  • Gittelsohn J, Mui Y, Adam A, Lin S, Kharmats A, Igusa T, Lee BY, “Incorporating systems science principles into the development of obesity prevention interventions: Principles, benefits and challenges,” Current Obesity Reports, Special Issue on “Preventing Obesity” 2015; 4:., PMID: 26069864 [PubMed] PMCID: PMC4452216
  • Mui Y, Lee BY, Adam A, et al. Healthy versus Unhealthy Suppliers in Food Desert Neighborhoods: A Network Analysis of Corner Stores’ Food Supplier Networks. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2015;12(12):15058-15074., PMCID: PMC4690901
  • Wong MS, Nau C, Kharmats AY, et al. Using a computational model to quantify the potential impact of changing the placement of healthy beverages in stores as an intervention to “Nudge” adolescent behavior choice. BMC Public Health. 2015;15:1284-015-2626-0. PMID: 26700158, PMCID: PMC4690297.
  • Mui, Y., Gittelsohn, J., & Jones-Smith, J. C. (2017). Longitudinal associations between change in neighborhood social disorder and change in food swamps in an urban setting.Journal of Urban Health : Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine, 94(1), 75-86. doi:10.1007/s11524-016-0107-0 [doi]. PMID: 28074429, PMCID: PMC5359167
  • Lee BY, Bartsch SM, Mui Y, Haidari LA, Spiker ML, Gittelsohn J (2017) “A systems approach to obesity.” Nutrition Reviews 75 (suppl 1): 94-106. PMID: 28049754, PMCID: PMC5207008
  • Gittelsohn J, Anderson Steeves E, Mui Y, Kharmats AY, Hopkins LC, Dennis D. B’more healthy communities for kids: Design of a multi-level intervention for obesity prevention for low-income African American children. BMC Public Health. 2014;14(1):942. PMID:25209072, PMCID: PMC4168194
  • Coakley HL, Anderson Steeves E, Jones-Smith JC, Hopkins L, Braunstein N, Mui Y , Gittelsohn J (2014) Where Do Low-Income Children Get Food? Combining Ground-Truthing and Technology to Improve Accuracy in Establishing Children’s Food Purchasing Behaviors, Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition, 9:3, 418-430. PMID: 25729465 [PubMed], PMCID: PMC4344129
  • Gudzune KA, Welsh C, Lane E, Chissell Z, Anderson Steeves E, Gittelsohn J. (2015) “Increasing access to fresh produce by partnering urban farms with corner stores: a pilot study in a low-income urban setting,” Public Health Nutrition, Feb 4:1-5. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 25649045, PMCID: PMC4524788
  • Johnson, K. A., Steeves, E. A., Gewanter, Z. R., & Gittelsohn, J. (2016). Food in My Neighborhood: Exploring the Food Environment through Photovoice with Urban, African American Youth. Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition. 2017; 12(3): 394-405. PMCID: PMC5844507
  • Kim, M., Budd, N., Batorsky, B., Krubiner, C., Manchikanti, S., Waldrop, G., Trude, A, Gittelsohn, J. (2017). Barriers to and facilitators of stocking healthy food options: Viewpoints of baltimore city small storeowners. Ecology of Food and Nutrition, 56(1), 17-30. doi:10.1080/03670244.2016.1246361 [doi]. PMID: 27841664, PMCID: PMC5702771
  • Melissa Sattler, Laura Hopkins, Elizabeth Anderson Steeves, Angelica Cristello,Morgan Mccloskey, Joel Gittelsohn & Kristen Hurley (2015): Characteristics of Youth Food Preparation in Low-Income, African American Homes: Associations with Healthy Eating Index Scores, Ecology of Food and Nutrition. PMID:25706350, PMCID:PMC4466010
  • Vedovato GM, Surkan PJ, Jones-Smith J, Steeves EA, Han E, Trude ACB, Kharmats AY, Gittelsohn J. Food insecurity, overweight and obesity among low-income African-American families in Baltimore City: Associations with food-related perceptions. Public Health (In Press) ID: PHN-RES-2015-0391. PMID:26441159, PMCID: PMC4823174, NIHMSID: NIHMS756142
  • Han E, Jones-Smith J, Surkan PJ, Kharmats AY, Vedovato GM, Trude ACB, Anderson Steeves E, Gittelsohn J. Low Income African American Adults share weight status, food-related psychosocial factors, and behaviours with their children. Obesity, Science and Practice. 2015; 1 (2):78-87. PMID: 27774251, PMCID: PMC5064723
  • Gittelsohn J, Mui Y, Igusa T, Lin S, Lee B, Seiden A, Gorstein A, Welch P, Bleich S. Simulating the impact of an urban farm tax credit policy in a low income urban setting. Harvard Health Policy Review.
  • Anderson Steeves E, Jones-Smith J, Hopkins L, Gittelsohn J. Perceived Social Support From Friends and Parents for Eating Behavior and Diet Quality Among Low-Income, Urban, Minority Youth. J Nutr Educ Behav. 2016; 48(5):304-310.e1. PMID: 26865358, PMCID: PMC4865426
  • Anderson Steeves E, Johnson KA, Pollard S, Jones-Smith J, Pollack K, Lindstrom-Johnson S, Hopkins L, Gittelsohn J. Social influences on eating and physical activity behaviours of urban, minority youths. Public Health Nutrition. 2016; 19(18): 3406-3416. PMID: 27491967, PMCID: PMC5730349, NIHMS: 922800
  • Trude ACB, Kharmats AY, Hurley KM, Anderson Steeves E, Talegawkar SA, Gittelsohn J. Household, psychosocial, and individual-level factors associated with fruit, vegetable, and fiber intake among low-income urban African American youth. BMC Public Health. 2016;16(1):1-10. PMID: 27558162, PMCID: PMC4997673
  • Yamaguchi, M., Steeves, E. A., Shipley, C., Hopkins, L. C., Cheskin, L. J., & Gittelsohn, J. (2016). Inconsistency between self-reported energy intake and body mass index among urban, african-american children. PloS One, 11(12), e0168303. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0168303 [doi]. PMID: 27977776, PMCID: PMC5158042
  • Hopkins LC, Sattler M, Anderson Steeves E, Jones-Smith JC, Gittelsohn J. Breakfast Consumption Frequency and Its Relationship to BMI and Overall Diet Quality, using Healthy Eating Index 2010, among Adolescents in a Low-Income Urban Setting. In Press, Ecol Food Nutr. PMID: 28604287, NIHMS922805, PMCID: PMC5725744
  • Sato PM, Steeves EA, Carnell S, et al. A youth mentor-led nutritional intervention in urban recreation centers: a promising strategy for childhood obesity prevention in low-income neighborhoods. Health Educ Res. 2016;31(2):195-206.PMID: 26936480. PMID: 26936480, PMCID: PMC5007578
  • Schwendler, T., Shipley, C., Budd, N., Trude, A., Surkan, P. J., Anderson Steeves, E., Gittelsohn, J. (2017). Development and Implementation of the B’More Healthy Communities for Kid’s Store and Wholesaler Intervention. Health Promotion Practice. 2017; 18(6):822-832. doi:10.1177/1524839917696716 [doi]. PMID: 28343413, PMCID: PMC5729580
  • Budd N, Cuccia A, Jeffries JK, Prasad D, Frick KD, Powell L, Katz FA, Gittelsohn J. B’More healthy retail rewards – Design of a multilevel communications and pricing intervention to improve the food environment in Baltimore City. BMC Public Health 2015; 15:283. PMID: 25885923, PMCID: PMC4379588
  • Yamaguchi, M., Steeves, E. A., Shipley, C., Hopkins, L. C., Cheskin, L. J., & Gittelsohn, J. Inconsistency between self-reported energy intake and body mass index among urban, African-American children. PloS One. 2016; 11(12), e0168303. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0168303 [doi]. PMID: 27977776, PMCID: PMC5158042
  • Campbell EA, Shapiro M, Welsh C, Bleich SN, Cobb LK, Gittelsohn J. Healthy Food Availability among Food Sources in Rural Maryland Counties. Journal of Hunger & Environmental Nutrition. 2017; 1-14. PMID: 29242739, NIHMS922806, PMCID: PMC5726566
  • Budd N, Jeffries J, Jones-Smith J, Kharmats A, McDermott A, Gittelsohn J. Store-directed price promotions and communications strategies improve healthier food supply and demand: impact results from a randomized controlled, Baltimore City store-intervention trial. Public Health Nutr. 2017; 1-11. PMID: 28222818, NIHMS922804, PMCID: PMC5725746
  • Trude ACB, Anderson Steeves E, Shipley C, Surkan PJ, Sato P, Estep T, Clanton S, Lachenmayr L, Gittelsohn J. A Youth-Leader Program in Baltimore City Recreation Centers: Lessons Learned and Applications. Health Promotion Practice. 2017; Sep 1:1524839917728048. doi: 10.1177/1524839917728048. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 28899234, PMCID: PMC5748364, NIHMS92280
  • Perepezko K, Tingey, L., Sato, P., Rastatter, S., Shipley, C., Cheskin, L., Gittelsohn, J. Partnering with Carryout Restaurants: Development and Implementation of a Menu Redesign Intervention in a Low Income Urban Setting. Health Education and Research. 2017 Dec 27. doi: 10.1093/her/cyx078. [Epub ahead of print]. PMID: 29293987
  • Gittelsohn J, Trude A, Poirier L, Ross A, Ruggiero C, Schwendler T, Anderson-Steeves E. The Impact of a Multi-Level Multi-Component Childhood Obesity Prevention Trial on Healthy Food Availability, Sales, and Purchasing in a Low-Income Urban Area. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(11): 1371; doi:10.3390/ijerph14111371. PMID: 29125558, PMCID: PMC5708010
  • Garcia MT, Sato P, Trude A, Eckmann T, Anderson Steeves EA, Hurley K, Bogus C, Gittelsohn J. Factors associated with home meal preparation among low-income urban African-American adults. Ecology of Food and Nutrition. 2018; 57(1):13-31. doi: 10.1080/03670244.2017.1406853. PMID: 29227695, NIHMS952091, PMCID: PMC5884711
  • Mui Y, Jones-Smith JC, Thornton RLJ, Pollack K, Gittelsohn J. Relationships between Vacant Homes and Food Swamps: A Longitudinal Study of an Urban Food Environment. Int J Environ Res Public Health. 2017; 14(11): 1426. PMID: 29160811, PMCID: PMC5708065
  • Ross A, Shipley C, Krishnen N, Gittelsohn J. A mixed methods assessment of the barriers and readiness for meeting the SNAP depth of stock requirements in Baltimore’s small food stores. Ecology of Food and Nutrition. 2018;57(2):94-108. PMID: 29283673, NIHMSID 952094, PMCID: PMC6233298
  • Henry J, Trude A, Surkan J, Anderson-Steeves E, Hopkins L, Gittelsohn J. Psychosocial Determinants of Food Acquisition and Preparation in Low-Income, Urban, African American Households. Health Education and Behavior. ID: HEB-17-0375 (In press) doi.org/10.1177/1090198118760686. PMID: 29589482, NIHMS975350
  • Nau C, Kumanyika S, Gittelsohn J, Adam A, Wong M, Mui Y, Lee BY. Identifying financially sustainable pricing interventions to promote healthier beverage purchases in small neighborhood stores. Preventing Chronic Disease. 2018; 15:160611. PMCID: PMC5798217, PMID: 29369758
  • Seifu L, Ruggiero C, Ferguson M, Mui Y, Lee BY, Gittelsohn J. Simulation modeling to assist with childhood obesity control: Perceptions of Baltimore City policymakers. J Public Health Pol (2018) 39: 173. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41271-018-0125-0
  • Nam, C.S., Ross, A., Shipley, C., Ferguson, M., Mui, Y., Lee, B. Y., Gittelsohn, J. (2018). Process Evaluation and Lessons Learned from Engaging Local Policymakers in the B’More Healthy Communities for Kids Trial. Health Education & Behavior. 1:1090198118778323
  • Trude A, Kharmats AY, Jones-Smith J, Gittelsohn J. Exposure to a Multi-Level Childhood Obesity Prevention Trial: Patterns, Determinants, and Consequences. Trials. 2018;19:287. doi: 10.1186/s13063-018-2663-y. PMCID: PMC5964684
  • Loh H, Schwendler T, Trude A, Anderson Steeves E, Cheskin L, Lange S, Gittelsohn J. Implementation of Text Messaging and Social Media Strategies in a Multi-level Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention: Process Evaluation Results. Inquiry. 2018; 55: 46958018779189. doi: 10.1177/0046958018779189. PMID: 29865969, PMCID: PMC6022210
  • Ruggiero C, Poirier L, Trude A, Yang T, Schwendler T, Gunen B, Loh H, Perepezko K, Nam C, Sato P, Gittelsohn J. Implementation of B’More Healthy Communities for Kids: A Multi-Level, Multi-Component Obesity Prevention Trial. 2018; doi: 10.1093/her/cyy031.
  • Trude ACB, Surkan PJ, Cheskin LJ, Gittelsohn J. A multilevel multicomponent childhood obesity prevention program improves healthier food purchasing and reduces sweet snacks consumption among low-income African American youth. Nutrition Journal. Nutrition Journal. 2018; 17(1):96. doi: 10.1186/s12937-018-0406-2
  • Trude ACB, Surkan PJ, Cheskin LJ, Gittelsohn J. A multilevel multicomponent childhood obesity prevention program improves healthier food purchasing and reduces sweet snacks consumption among low-income African American youth. Nutrition Journal. 2018 [Epub ahead of print] doi: 10.1017/S1368980018003038.
  • Gittelsohn J, Novotny R, Trude ACB, Butel J., Mikkelsen BE. Challenges and lessons learned from multi-level multi-component interventions to prevent and reduce child obesity. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health. 2019; 16(1):30. doi:10.3390/ijerph16010030
  • Ross, A Krishnan N, Panchal J, Brooks J, Lloyd E, Lee TJ, Gittelsohn J. Formative research for an innovative smartphone application to improve distribution of healthy foods to corner stores in Baltimore City. Ecol Food Nutr.. 2018 Dec 7:1-20. doi: 10.1080/03670244.2018.1553778. [Epub ahead of print]
  • Gittelsohn J, Trude A, Poirier L, Loh H, Ross A, Schwendler T, Shipley C. B’More Healthy Communities for Kids – a Multilevel Obesity Prevention Program for African American Children: Selected Program Impacts and Sustainability. In: ISBNPA, 2017, Victoria, Canada
  • Schmall A, Trude A, Gittelsohn J. Process Evaluation of a Youth-Mentor Led: A Childhood Obesity Prevention Intervention at Urban Recreation Centers. In: Experimental Biology, 2017, Chicago, USA
  • Trude A, Anderson Steeves E, Lachenmayr L, Shipley C, Sato P, Gittelsohn J. Impact of a Multi-Level Multi-Component Food Environment/Behavioral Intervention on Youth Leaders. In: Experimental Biology, 2017, Chicago (Oral Presentation)
  • Shipley C, Nam C, Seifu S, Mui Y, Lee B, Gittelsohn J. Engaging Local Policymakers in a Multilevel, Multicomponent Obesity Prevention Trial in Baltimore City. Oral Presentation at The Obesity Society Meeting. New Orleans, USA.
  • Gittelsohn J, Loh H, Gunen B, Trude A, Cheskin L. Use of Social Media in a Multilevel, Multicomponent Obesity Prevention Trial for Urban African-American families. In: The Obesity Society, 2016, New Orleans, LA, USA.
  • Trude A, Jones-Smith J, Chen E, Eckmann T, Gittelsohn J. Exposure to a Multi-level Childhood Obesity Prevention Trial: Patterns, Determinants, and Consequences. In: The Obesity Society, 2016, New Orleans, LA, USA.
  • Gittelsohn J, Lachenmayr L, Trude A. Sustaining a Successful Youth-Leader Program as part of a Multi-level, Multi-Component Food Environment/ Behavioral Intervention. In: Society for nutrition Education and Behavior, 2016, San Diego, CA
  • Anderson Steeves EA, Shipley C, Mejia Ruiz MJ, Jones-Smith J, Pollack K, Cheskin L, Hurley K, Hopkins LC, Gittelsohn J. Evaluation of a Youth-led Intervention for Childhood Obesity Prevention Among Urban, Minority Youth: Perceptions and Impact among Youth-leaders. Poster Presentation at International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, June 2016.
  • Gittelsohn J, Loh I, Schwendler T, Shipley C, Trude A, Eckmann T. B’More Healthy Communities for Kids, a multilevel obesity prevention program for African American children: Wave 1 process and impact results. Oral Presentation at International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity Annual Meeting in Cape Town, South Africa, June 2016.
  • Trude A, Anderson Steeves E, Shipley C, Mejia Ruiz MJ, Sato P, Lachenmayr L, Gittelsohn J. Sustaining the youth‐leader program in Baltimore City recreation centers: formative research findings. In: Experimental Biology, 2016, San Diego (Oral Presentation)
  • Gittelsohn J, Loh I, Schwendler T, Shipley C, Trude A. B’More Healthy Communities for Kids, a Multilevel Obesity Prevention Program for African American Children: Process Findings. Oral Presentation at Experimental Biology Annual Meeting, San Diego, California, April 2016.
  • Gittelsohn J, Perepezko K, Anderson Steeves E, Shipley C, Rastatter S, Mui Y. Monitoring and evaluation of B’More Healthy Communities for Kids: A multi-level, multi-component obesity prevention program for low-income, urban African American children. Accepted for oral Presentation at International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Edinburgh, Scotland, June 2015.
  • Trude A; Anderson Steeves E; Shipley C; Mejía Ruiz MJ; Sato P; Gittelsohn J. Sustaining the Youth-Leader Program in Baltimore City Recreation Centers: Formative Research Findings. In: SLAN, 2015, Punta Cana (Oral). November 2015.
  • Rastatter S, Perepezko K, Campbell E, Yang T, Shipley C, Sato P, Gittelsohn J. Implementation of a corner store intervention as part of a multi-level, multi component obesity prevention trial in low income neighborhoods of Baltimore City. November 2015 In: Obesity Society Meeting. LA, USA.
  • Shipley C, Sato P, Anderson-Steeves A, Perepezko K, Rastatter S, Gittelsohn J. Implementation of a mentor – led recreation center intervention within a multi-level multicomponent obesity prevention intervention in Baltimore City. November 2015 In: The Obesity Society Meeting. Los Angeles, USA.
  • Trude A, Anderson Steeves E, Talegawkar SA, Gittelsohn J. Household and Individual-level Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Intake among Low-Income Urban African American Adolescents. November 2015 In: Obesity Society Meeting. LA, USA.
  • Gittelsohn, Trude, Changing Factors in the Retail Environment to Facilitate Consumption of Healthy Grain-Based Foods. Oral Presentation at: Whole Grain Summit, Portland, Oregon. June 2015.
  • Yang T, Steeves EA, Rastatter R, Kharmats A, Welsh C, Shipley C, Gittelsohn J. Process evaluation findings of B’More Healthy Communities for Kids: A multi-level, multi-component obesity prevention program. Accepted for poster presentation at Experimental Biology, Boston, MA, April 2015.
  • Gittelsohn J, Yang T, Mui Y, Kharmats A, Steeves EA, Welsh C, Shipley C. Process evaluation to monitor and guide a multi-level, multi-component obesity prevention program for low-income, African American youth. Accepted for poster presentation at Experimental Biology, Boston, MA, April 2015.
  • Ruggiero C, Poirier L, Trude A, Schwendler T, Sato P, Yang T, Gunen B, Nam S, Loh H, Gittelsohn J. Implementation of B’More Healthy Communities for Kids: A Multi-Level, Multi-Component Obesity Prevention Program. Poster Presentation at The Obesity Society Meeting. Washington, DC 2017.
  • Gunen B, Trude A, Shipley C, Loh I, Poirier L, Thorne-Lyman A, Gittelsohn J. The Impact of a Text Messaging and Social Media Intervention on Caregivers’ Psychosocial Outcomes. Abstract presentation at: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2017; Oct. 30 – Nov. 2, 2017; Washington, DC. www.obesityweek.com.
  • Gittelsohn J, Poirier L, Shipley C, Trude A. Multi-level food system intervention improves stocking of promoted healthy foods in urban corner stores. Poster Presentation at The Obesity Society Meeting. 2017, Washington, DC
  • Woolley R, Trude A, Headrick, G, Thorne-Lyman A, Gittelsohn J. SNAP Participation Associated with Food Source and Expenditures Among Urban, African American Adults. In: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at Obesity Week 2017; Washington, DC
  • Headrick G, Trude A, Woolley R, Thorne-Lyman A, Gittelsohn J. Diet Quality Among Low Income, Urban, African-American Households: Associations with Food Insecurity. Poster Presentation at The Obesity Society Meeting. 2017, Washington, DC
  • Liu Y, Gittelsohn J, Ma Y, Trude ACB, Ding N, Wensel CR, Poirier L, Wen D. Gross National Income Is Nonlinearly Associated with Childhood Obesity: An Ecological Analysis. Under review abstract at: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2017; Oct. 30 – Nov. 2, 2017; Washington, DC. www.obesityweek.com.
  • Trude A, Surkan PJ, Ruggiero C, Loh IH, Gunen B, Poirier LK, Wensel C, Gittelsohn J. A Childhood Obesity Prevention Trial Reduces Sweets Intake Among African American Adolescents. Under review abstract at: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2017; Oct. 30 – Nov. 2, 2017; Washington, DC. www.obesityweek.com.
  • Poirier L, Harding J, Trude A, Fisher C, Petsoulis C, Gittelsohn J. Association of Living Proximity to Urban Farms on Fruit & Vegetable Intake by Low-income Children. Under review abstract at: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2017; Oct. 30 – Nov. 2, 2017; Washington, DC. www.obesityweek.com
  • Wensel CR, Paige D, Trujillo A, Steeves EA, Poirier LK, Ruggiero C, Trude A, Patel S, Gittelsohn J. Testing Behavioral Economic Strategies to Improve Food Choice in Small Food Stores Accepting WIC. Under review abstract at: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekhttp://www.obesityweek.com.
  • Trude A, Surkan PJ, Ruggiero C, Anderson Steeves E, Gittelsohn J. The Impact of a Multilevel Obesity Prevention Program on Fruit and Vegetable Purchasing and Consumption among African American Adults. Poster Presentation at: American Society for Nutrition Annual Meeting, 2018; Boston, MA.
  • Trude A. Impact evaluation of a multilevel multicomponent childhood obesity prevention on diet and food-related behaviors among low-income African American children. Oral presentation at: International Society for Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA), 2018; Hong Kong.
  • Trude A, Surkan PJ, Pollack Porter K, Cheskin LJ, Anderson Steeves E, Gittelsohn J. Child Obesity Prevention Trial Exposure Correlates with Greater Fruit Intake in Youth’s Caregivers. Poster presentation at: The Obesity Society Annual Meeting at ObesityWeekSM 2018; Nov. 11-15, 2018; Nashville, TN.
  • Shipley C, Nam C, Seifu S, Mui Y, Lee B, Gittelsohn J. Engaging Local Policymakers in a Multilevel, Multicomponent Obesity Prevention Trial in Baltimore City. Oral Presentation at The Obesity Society Meeting. New Orleans, USA.
  • Trude A, Anderson Steeves E, Talegawkar SA, Gittelsohn J. Household and Individual-level Determinants of Fruit and Vegetable Intake among Low-Income Urban African American Adolescents. November 2015 In: Obesity Society Meeting. LA, USA.

If you would like the data collection forms please email Joel Gittelsohn.

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